communication

Being Assertive

Have you ever heard yourself say, “I’m a nice person. I’m a polite person. I’d never intentionally do anything to hurt anybody. So why don’t other people give me the respect I deserve?” The problem could well be due to a difficulty with assertion. Maybe you aren’t showing your nice, polite, and respectful qualities to other people. Unless they can see who you truly are, underneath it all, other people might not know how you expect to be treated. And this can lead to some unhappy experiences.

No Secrets … Telling the Truth in Our Relationships

 

When we commit ourselves to a relationship with another person, we rightly expect to experience a sense of fulfillment that we didn’t have before. Humans, as social beings, seem to have a universal desire to find a partner. Sexual attraction often serves as the motivator for making initial contact with the other person, and this is usually replaced over time with a deeper sense of commitment and intimacy.

It comes as a terrible disappointment to some people when the sexual phase of their relationship fails to lead in time to something deeper. The task, then, is to understand the forces which block the development of a deeper sense of intimacy – and to do something about it. Fortunately, with some work – and it’s often hard work – couples can learn to move into the stage of deeper sharing and more fulfillment in their relationships.

Actively Listening – the Other Half of Effective Communication

 

Active Communication Requires One Person to Talk and the Other to Listen … and Both to Do Their Parts Well

Listening is the other half of communication. Our first thought, when we think about communication, may be to consider the speaker’s ability to convey ideas effectively. What we often forget is that without a listener the speaker may as well be talking to the wind. Just as effective speaking is an acquired skill, so is good listening. Some do it better than others. But all of us can learn to enrich our own listening skills.

7 Tips for Ending a Love Relationship with Grace, Dignity and Compassion

It’s not uncommon to fall out of love with someone.

Even though you have been close for a long time, you may feel that now is the time to end the relationship.

The question then becomes, what’s the best way to go about it?

Even if you feel that you’re no longer in love, you probably still care for your partner to a degree, and you want to break up on as best of terms as possible.

Here are some tips on how you can end your love relationship with grace, dignity, and compassion.

(6) Ways to Increase Intimacy and Escape the ‘Roommate’ Syndrome

Have you felt like you and your partner are more like roommates than intimate companions? Watching Netflix in your sweatpants while your partner plays a game on their cell phone sounds like a hot date, right?

Not exactly.

There is not a lot about that scenario radiating romance. What it does portray is a mutual level of extreme comfort you and your partner have embraced.

Of course, nothing is wrong with feeling comfortable around your partner. Actually, you want to be comfortable with each other. But you also want to nurture the intimate connection you have and acting like roommates simply doesn’t do that.

If you feel stuck in the ‘roommate rut’, try these suggestions:

Should We Move In Together – (12) Questions

 

Many couples take the big step of moving in together without first considering the full ramification of the decision.

When you started dating, you most likely each had your own space to live. Now, though, you will be sharing a space together.

How you both communicate, resolve conflict, and deal with emotional and day-to-day stress are important considerations. That’s why it’s crucial to have several discussion about this big decision.

Consider these (12) questions:

Relationship Restoration: How to Forgive and Reconcile After an Affair

Words that describe reconciliation include ‘repair’, ‘heal’, ‘fix’ ‘rebuild’ and ‘restore’.

Sometimes these terms even have a place at the international level, when two or more countries in conflict can find reconciliation after a war.

The same can be said for partners whose relationship has been rocked by an affair. “War” may seem to be a strong word to apply to this situation. But just as in war, infidelity involves people who have very different perspectives.

Despite having ongoing differences and difficulty, it is possible for couples to find forgiveness and reconcile after an affair.

Here’s how this can happen:

Emotional Unavailability – When Your Partner Doesn’t Show Feelings

When we commit to a relationship, we usually expect that our partner will have roughly the same level of emotional involvement that we have. Many of us hope to find a soul-mate, a partner who can share and understand our feelings and ways of thinking on an intensely personal level. Others don’t expect such an intense level of involvement and feel more comfortable maintaining personal privacy in the relationship.

Conflicts may arise when partners have different about how close they should become. One partner may feel emotionally stranded, feeling abandoned and craving more closeness, while the other partner may feel smothered or pressured into providing more of his or her emotional self than can possibly be given. 

Overcoming Shyness and Social Anxiety – 7 Practical Tips

Living with social anxiety and shyness can be difficult in our modern world.

Unless you live in a remote cabin, you may be interacting with people all the time. Plus, there are social situations that you may be obligated to attend (such as meetings or a work party) that require human interaction.

However, all hope is not lost. There are ways that you can conquer your social anxiety and lessen your stress without becoming a hermit.

Consider these 7 tips: