trust in relationships

No Secrets … Telling the Truth in Our Relationships

 

When we commit ourselves to a relationship with another person, we rightly expect to experience a sense of fulfillment that we didn’t have before. Humans, as social beings, seem to have a universal desire to find a partner. Sexual attraction often serves as the motivator for making initial contact with the other person, and this is usually replaced over time with a deeper sense of commitment and intimacy.

It comes as a terrible disappointment to some people when the sexual phase of their relationship fails to lead in time to something deeper. The task, then, is to understand the forces which block the development of a deeper sense of intimacy – and to do something about it. Fortunately, with some work – and it’s often hard work – couples can learn to move into the stage of deeper sharing and more fulfillment in their relationships.

7 Tips for Ending a Love Relationship with Grace, Dignity and Compassion

It’s not uncommon to fall out of love with someone.

Even though you have been close for a long time, you may feel that now is the time to end the relationship.

The question then becomes, what’s the best way to go about it?

Even if you feel that you’re no longer in love, you probably still care for your partner to a degree, and you want to break up on as best of terms as possible.

Here are some tips on how you can end your love relationship with grace, dignity, and compassion.

Should We Move In Together – (12) Questions

 

Many couples take the big step of moving in together without first considering the full ramification of the decision.

When you started dating, you most likely each had your own space to live. Now, though, you will be sharing a space together.

How you both communicate, resolve conflict, and deal with emotional and day-to-day stress are important considerations. That’s why it’s crucial to have several discussion about this big decision.

Consider these (12) questions:

Relationship Restoration: How to Forgive and Reconcile After an Affair

Words that describe reconciliation include ‘repair’, ‘heal’, ‘fix’ ‘rebuild’ and ‘restore’.

Sometimes these terms even have a place at the international level, when two or more countries in conflict can find reconciliation after a war.

The same can be said for partners whose relationship has been rocked by an affair. “War” may seem to be a strong word to apply to this situation. But just as in war, infidelity involves people who have very different perspectives.

Despite having ongoing differences and difficulty, it is possible for couples to find forgiveness and reconcile after an affair.

Here’s how this can happen:

When You Cheated on Your Partner, Is Disclosure the Best Option?

So, you’ve cheated on your partner and are now struggling with the aftermath.

You have guilt and lots of other emotions swirling around inside you. In fact, there are two different parts of you telling you to do vastly different things.

On the one hand, you feel that you should tell your partner what happened and be honest. The other half says that you shouldn’t tell at all. In fact, you may have already convinced yourself that you will keep this hidden from your partner at all costs.

What you decide to do now will have great ramifications for your relationship in the future.

What should you do?

Building Trust in Relationships

It is difficult to achieve intimacy in a relationship unless we have the ability to trust. We tend to focus on other people when we think about trust – that is, we might ask, who out there can be trusted and who cannot? But it may be more helpful to look inside ourselves and to think about trust as something that we either do well, or not.