THERAPY

Eating Disorders

An Eating Disorder Is a Very Serious Problem That Demands Immediate Attention

The Chinese used to bind the feet of women to make them smaller. So tiny and fragile were their feet, in fact, that some women were left essentially crippled, barely able to walk. To the Chinese, this was a sign of beauty and social status. But to us it seems a cruel and bizarre practice.

The irony is that we in present-day American society do something just as cruel, just as bizarre as the Chinese did. We tend to see the thin, emaciated, malnourished female as beautiful. If your body has “the look,” you are seen as healthier, younger, better able to wear the right clothes, and you will gain social approval more readily.

Distortions in Your Body Image

“What disturbs people’s minds is not events, but their judgments on events.”

Epictetus

In China, parents once bound the feet of their daughters in pursuit of beauty. In parts of Africa, both men and women elongate their earlobes and decorate their skin with minerals to look attractive, and this trend may be found in the United States now. At one time in this society, we found plump, rotund people to be the epitome of beauty.

Old movies show us that the Tarzans and Supermen of past decades would hardly pass muster in today’s gyms. Today we define beauty as a thin, youthful, and muscular look. Today we go under the knife and on extreme diets to achieve a socially acceptable appearance – not to mention tattoos and body piercing – all practices that are similar to the early Chinese custom of binding feet.

Although changes are taking place, strong social standards have dictated, especially through the media, how we should look – and if our own bodies deviate from these expectations, which is the case for almost all of us, we can feel inferior and ashamed. We hide. We cover up. We don’t like an important part of our selves. We feel depressed. We feel anxious in front of other people. We feel powerless – and we are apologetic when we show the world who we are.

Losing Your Relationship – Aftermath of Divorce

Most divorcing people are forced to come to terms with a number of fears. What will people say? Who can I trust to talk to? How can I handle my partner’s anger toward me? How do I deal with my own anger? Am I a complete failure? How can I be a single parent? Will I be able to keep my children? What about money? Can I do the banking and buy groceries and pay bills and fix the car? Can I handle my loneliness? Am I completely unlovable? Will I ever love anyone else again? Do I have the energy for this much change? When we hold on to our fears and refuse to do anything about them, we increase the likelihood that these will be the very areas where we experience trouble.

When Your Teen Tells You They’re Gay: Tips on Responding

For many LGBTQ youths, the act of “coming out” to their parents that they are gay is nerve-racking.

They may have already told some friends, but coming out to you, their parents, is a whole other matter. Worries about being accepted or loved by you afterwards will probably be on their minds.

They may be nervous, anxious, even scared to tell you something that they have kept hidden—perhaps for years.

You may very well have a wide range of emotions during these discussions.

For obvious reasons, this won’t be an easy conversation for either of you. How you respond to your teen’s revelation is critical.

Here are several tips to help you respond sensibly.

Yes, Sexual Betrayal Can Lead to These PTSD Symptoms!

 

Love is war. So the saying goes goes .

That comparison may actually be fitting in connection with something you perhaps haven’t thought of—trauma.

It’s no secret that sexual infidelity can be physically harmful and emotionally crushing. A betrayed partner may feel a whole range of devastating emotions and experiences a bewildering variety of bodily symptoms.

One moment they feel angry and irritated, the next as if living in a daze where nothing matters. They can’t sleep, they can’t eat. It’s as if they’ve gone crazy.

It’s a reaction to the trauma of betrayal.

Breaking Free of Loneliness

 

Only the lonely
Know the way I feel tonight
Only the lonely
Know this feeling ain’t right
Roy Orbison

If you feel lonely, you’re not alone.

Loneliness is a subjective sense of isolation – a feeling of not being able to connect with other people, a sense of being apart. As humans, we feel the need to be with other people. We need to relate to others, to get involved in their lives, to work with them, and to express our emotions around other people. Our social needs are nearly as powerful as our other basic needs, like our needs for food, water, and shelter.

Self-Compassion: Why it’s Much Harder Than Compassion for Others

 

Do you find it easier to forgive others than yourself?

Are you able to accept others’ mistakes but not your own?

Practicing self-compassion can actually be very difficult. This is especially true if you learned as a child to care more about others, or if you have a hard time forgiving yourself.

Once a Cheater, Always a Cheater? Myths and Facts

Clearly, whenever you’ve been cheated on, there are many feelings that arise.

However, some of these emotions could be based on myths about those who cheat. And that can cause you to make decisions based on faulty information.

If you are trying to cope with a partner’s infidelity, get the facts and reject the myths.

Procrastination Hurts Relationships

Almost everyone has been affected by procrastination at one time or another –  when we or someone we rely on is compelled to put of to another day or time, to endlessly delay completing tje task at hand. For some people it’s a [persistent problem while for others it happens only in certain areas of their lives. The result is the same for everyone – increased anxiety, wasted time, poor performance, missed opportunities, guilt, making excuses and avoiding people who depend on us.

It can cause suffering in a committed relationship, when one partner delays or avoids keeping promises or agreements, putting the relationship at risk. And relationships outside the home – friendships; at work and in the community – can suffer. Being unreliable can jeopardize one’s personal reputation. There are better ways of dealing with the demands of our everyday lives, once we accept that we are a procrastinator and make a commitment to change.

Toxic Communication Patterns

Dirty fighting can weaken and ultimately break a relationship in the same way that rust weakens a piece of metal. Dirty fighting breaks the bonds of intimacy and causes cracks in the foundation of the relationship. These cracks spread and just like rusty metal eventually breaks apart, at some point the relationship collapses. Both of you ultimately suffer. Here are some toxic communication patterns to avoid: